New member – Welcome Bin Liu!

Text by Bin Liu

Note from LL: Our new postdoc, Bin Liu, is the first member of our lab, who ended up working here because of this blog. Literally. He read the post about potential postdoc positions and contacted us. And the rest is, like they say, history. Welcome! (By the way, this program funding postdocs is ongoing, though the next deadline for applications is same time next year. Thus, there is time to plan ahead.)

bin liu welcome

I’ve been “walking” in the forest since 2004, when I started studing forestry as a college student in Northwest A & F University in China. After I finished my master’s study in Forest Ecology in 2010, I moved forward to my PhD’s research in Tree Physiology at University of Freiburg in Germany. My PhD’s research topic was about consequences of waterlogging on N metabolism in tree species, which provided me more insights into the strategies and mechanisms of how those forest tree species survive and adapt to harsh environmental stresses.

Thanks to Prof. Ülo Niinemets, my journey through plant science continues after I defended my dissertation in 2016. Now I am working as post-doc fellow in Prof. Niinemets’s laboratory. My research topic will focuse on stress-induced volatile phenylpropanoid/benzenoid compounds from different plant species. And at the same time, we are jointly applying for the Mobilitas Pluss grant, which is funded by the Estonian Research Council.

Out of lab work, there are normally three options I’d like to choose: cooking for my family, hiking through the forest or travelling to new cities. For the next five years I wish I could cook like a Michelin star chef, hike through most forest parks in Europe and complete a round-the-world tour with my family.

 

Selected papers:

Liu, B., Rennenberg, H., & Kreuzwieser, J. (2015). Hypoxia Affects Nitrogen Uptake and Distribution in Young Poplar (Populus×canescens) Trees. PloS one, 10(8), e0136579. (link to full text)
Liu, B., Rennenberg, H., & Kreuzwieser, J. (2015). Hypoxia induces stem and leaf nitric oxide (NO) emission from poplar seedlings. Planta, 241(3), 579-589. (link to full text)

 

Advertisements
This entry was posted in New member and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s